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Movement and Inactivity: The Role They Play In Blood Glucose Levels

It's been said that living a sedentary life can be just as detrimental to one's health as smoking. Watching TV, sitting behind a desk all day, or simply failing to get adequate exercise can increase blood pressure, mortality rates, cholesterol levels, and the likelihood of obesity. Recent reports also prove that inactivity can have a major impact on a person's blood glucose levels. Doctors at the University of Missouri have evaluated how inactivity impacts blood glucose levels. First, they had the volunteers walk an average of 5,000 steps per day for three days. Then, for another three days, volunteers stopped walking and used elevators and escalators more often.  In Phase I, the subjects had consistent glucose levels throughout the day. However, in Phase II, the glucose levels significantly spiked during periods of inactivity.  Inconsistencies and spikes in glucose levels are key contributors to the development of type II diabetes. The American College of Sports Medicine took this study to the next level. They compared the following three activities:

  • Standing: Glucose levels are 5 to 12 percent lower when standing as opposed to sitting.
  • Walking: These levels were reduced even more when a person started walking during the day. They lowered by 24 percent.
  • Cycling: Cycling lowered the glucose levels even more; they were down by 44 percent.
Clearly, staying active throughout the day can reduce one's risk of type II diabetes. Chiropractors are holistic practitioners—they care about the whole person. That is why they offer dietary and lifestyle recommendations to their patients. Their goal is to be a pillar of support to patients who want to live a healthy life.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, online July 27, 2016.